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Can Patriotism as religion encourage a sense of superiority by those who clain to be Patriots? Does it demand the same level of respect,loyalty and deference that religion does ? Is this really a bad requirement?

By Marine
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7 comments

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Geez, exactly how much footage of Germans worshipping Hitler do you watch, exactly? And JUST STOP THAT NOW!

AnneWimsey Level 8 Dec 6, 2018
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You are way off base as it has nothing to do with Germans or Nazi's.

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Both are bad.

Jolanta Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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If it wasn't for patriots you might not be enjoying the life you have. Thay are buried in many cemetaries all over the world.

@Marine Tell me more.

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I always root for the Patriots to lose, wicked bad.

Byrdsfan Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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Many simple minded people use the phrase “not a patriot” if someone does things they don’t agree with. Many of these same people consider it unpatriotic to oppose any war their country is involved in. The concept of patriotism opposes freedom of thought. For instance simply giving the reason that Colin Kaepernick went forward with his kneeling protests as simply being disrespectful and unpatriotic is an argument with little thought. Using the words patriotic or unpatriotic have just been a way to be dismissive.

Dave75 Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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Patriotism is not defined the same way by everyone.
I have no use for it.
Just like I have no use for religion.

KKGator Level 9 Dec 6, 2018
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See my reply above.

@Marine I saw it.

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I consider myself patriotic. But when a word gets capitalized where it is not required by grammar, it begins to suggest an unnecessary extremism on the issue. So I'm a patriot, not a Patriot.

John_Tyrrell Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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Great

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I consider myself a Patriot meaning I respect and am loyal to the concepts of our Constitution, military laws,and the laws of of country. It does not mean I accept bad laws or the or the neglect in upholding the merits of the Constitution such as the separation of church and state which is so prevalent at this time.A patriot can question and seek to correct what appears to be mistakes like opposing the right of a woman to do with her body as she wishes or protect the rights of the LGBT community or to protest a war that is wrong.Religion on the other hand does not appear to give it's members this freedom of action. It seems cannon law is without flaws and must be adhered to. This is a great wrong. Just look how many years catholics were condemned to hell for eating meat of Friday but the military could always do it and by rule of the pope so can all catholics now. This means there is a difference between Patriotism and religion.

Marine Level 8 Dec 6, 2018
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My country right or wrong. When it is right keep it right, when it is wrong make it right.

Not all religions are like that.

@WilliamFleming Define one that isn't.

@Marine

In my opinion real religion is a personal subjective set of experiences and a way of life. That kind of religion requires no organization whatsoever, and certainly not one that demands respect, loyalty, and deference.

So far as religious organizations that don’t require those things, you have Unitarians that require nothing. Quakers, New Thought Churches, and many others require nothing, not even belief. I think in general, Protestant Churches require belief in a creed, but as far as demanding respect, loyalty, and deference, no.

I grew up in a Baptist Church, and other than affirming belief in Baptist doctrines, there were no demands. There is no hierarchy of power—ministers answer to the members of each church, and they habitually get fired by vote. There is no one to demand anything. A Baptist Church could switch to Islam by a simple vote if it wanted to.

Edited

@WilliamFleming OK

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