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An individual is deprived of their livelihood because he/she won't perpetuate ridiculous myths:

BBC News: Teacher who denied Santa will not return to school.
[bbc.com]

By Condor5
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5 comments

0

No for many "Santa" is the epitome of giving. Not consumerism.

It depends entirely on how you view it.

I know people who volunteer at soup kitchens on the holiday - that is their Christmas every year. Should their 1st graders be made to disbelieve by a substitute teacher?

No. That was not her job.

No belief in the make believe is part of most childhoods. "Magical Thinking" is Normal.
When that belief is suspended depends very much on parental decisions.
This was not up to a school teacher. A substitute one in fact?
It was not part of her job description in any fashion.

Most of what we celebrate goes far past paganism into even further back solstice celebrations to encourage the return of the Sun from the dark realm.
I mean gees - kind of heavy for a 1st grader?

Absolutely rampant consumerism is terrible for adults. However for a child? Not so much.
Let kids be kids.

RavenCT Level 9 Dec 6, 2018
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undoubtedly I agree with what you're saying above..... however this.."Absolutely rampant consumerism is terrible for adults. However for a child? Not so much.
Let kids be kids." is exactly how those adults become so good at it.

I don't know how you equate soup kitchen with Santa Claus, seems to me those are polar opposites. If people working in soup kitchens want their children to understand giving, they should take their kids there for a visit; that's the epitome of giving. SC, in kids' minds, is all about getting. Why else do they put Santas in shopping malls?

@Condor5 They understood "Santa" to be a spirit of giving.
Not consumerism.

It's all in how you present it. It does not have to all commercialism. In their family it was not.

In mine we've drawn away from a million gifts for every child. It had gotten ridiculous.

I've done some handmade gifts and those go over very well.

But my point was it wasn't up to her to make her stand in a classroom. It was rather mean in fact.

I can hold the opposite view from a child and not ruin their magical thinking for them.

I might choose not to create their magical thinking either in some cases? But knowing it was there? No I would not do this.

First rule - don't cause deliberate harm to kids.

That's just my opinion and it's ok if it's different from other peoples. I don't teach kids so it won't be up to me.

But I won't be running down the street shouting "Santa doesn't exist!" anytime soon.

Oh and I have a round neighbor with a white beard - glasses and blue eyes... guess what happens to him when he goes out this time of year? Yup! He's kind of a curmudgeon and yet he still gets it. It's just "kid magic". They never ask him for anything. They're just happy to see him around.

1

As I stated when the story first came to my attention, I have very mixed feelings.

KKGator Level 9 Dec 6, 2018
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1

Saying that there is no Santa, no Easter Bunny, etc., is not a decision for that sub teacher to make. It's up to the parents to decide when the child is ready to be told. Yes, strictly speaking, it's perpetuating a myth, but it's up to the family to decide how to deal with that myth. This teacher made him/herself the judge of what is right and wrong ("It's wrong for these children to believe in Santa" ), and that's not a choice that she/he should make.

It's kind of like how parents deal with teaching their kids about sex. I may disagree with what a parent chooses to do or say on this subject, I might disagree with them in a discussion that the child was privy to, but I would not independently seek the child out to "set them straight." It wouldn't be my place to do this, nor is it my place to tell anyone's child (unless they are 15 or something) that there is no Santa.

Also, since this person is a substitute teacher, strictly speaking, s/he is not being deprived of a livelihood. Who knows whether this person was teaching full- or part-time? This individual may not have been totally dependent on that income, and there are other districts that need substitute teachers. And hopefully this person will now think twice before debunking a dearly-held childhood belief.

citronella Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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Santa Claus, as children relate to him now, is a fabrication of the Coca Cola company to sell sugar water, at one time laced with cocaine; he essentially represents gift-giving in promotion and perpetuation of consumerism which leads to resource depletion; typically for the peddling of unnecessary and useless crap.

If you're OK with all that, fine. I think it's an abomination.

@Condor5 You're certainly reading a lot more into the myth of Santa Claus than I am. Dislike consumerism all you want, but I don't think it hurts kids to have a few years where Christmas is exciting and filled with mystery.

@citronella excitement and mystery can be good things, agreed. Where those come from can be channeled into more beneficial and life-enhancing conduits, however, among which, imho, the xmas and Santa Claus myths are not included. My primary objection here is the fact that this person had his/her job taken away for a relatively minor offense. Those kids may have had 1, maybe 2 more years tops of Santa belief, if they didn't already likely know the truth, which I suspect they probably did.

@Condor5 To me the mistake this person made was NOT a minor offense. It's not the "yes or no on Santa" question; it was the fact that this person felt entitled to make a decision that was not hers to make. There was no academic content associated with what she told the kids, and the information that she shared was not hers to share, it was the parents' prerogative. To me it's the same thing as telling kids where babies come from, at an age when many of them don't need to know that yet. It's not just the information that she shared, it's the ARROGANCE of thinking that her view superseded anyone else's.

@citronella we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one.

2

She stepped outside of her remit....and she sounds a bit like a Spoilsport to me. I believe it is pretty harmless for children to believe in Santa and the Tooth Fairy, they grow up and out of these childish notions in the natural course of things anyway. If only they grew out of their belief in Jesus and God as easily.....now if some brave teachers want to take that mythology on, then they would have my wholehearted support.

Marionville Level 8 Dec 6, 2018
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The Santa Claus we see nowadays, and the one most children identify with, was invented by Coca Cola.

@Condor5 Possibly, not here in the U.K., though. We barely had heard of Coca Cola here when I was a child but I still knew of the Red Cloaked figure of Santa Claus or Father Christmas who filled our stockings and rode his reindeer sleigh.

@Marionville this incident is here, in the U.S., I don't know about where you are. I don't live there and don't know all the customs, so I can't comment with any authority.

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I don't know.

I'm pretty sure debunking Santa Claus is not on the curriculum at that age. Substitute teachers should stick reasonably close to the lesson plans.

John_Tyrrell Level 7 Dec 6, 2018
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Those characters are perpetuated for profit now, there are many legitimate things to wonder about in the world if parents really want their children to be in awe of their existence.

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